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clausuraf(pluralclausures)

Borrowed fromLate Latinclausūra, fromLatinclausus, past participle ofclaudō

chiusuraf(pluralchiusure)

FromLate Latinclūsura, variant ofclausūra, fromLatinclausus. Doublet of the borrowedclausura.

Croatam(genitiveCroatae);first declension

FromProto-Slavic*xorvat(“Croat”).

cryptaf(genitivecryptae);first declension

Ancient Greekκρυπτή(kruptḗ), female form of the adjectiveκρυπτός(krupts)

cultorm(genitivecultōris,femininecultrīx);third declension

cultrīxf(genitivecultrīcis,masculinecultor);third declension

cultūraf(genitivecultūrae);first declension

Fromcultus, perfect passive participle ofcolō(“I till, cultivate”).

cūlusm(genitivecūlī);second declension

cubusm(genitivecubī);second declension

FromAncient Greekκύβος(kbos)

cūpaf(genitivecūpae);first declension

LateandVulgar Latin. Probably fromcūpa(“tub, cask”); but compare alsoProto-West Germanic*kopp

Sanskritकूप(kūpa

cuppaf(genitivecuppae);first declension

cūpulaf(genitivecūpulae);first declension

cuprumn(genitivecuprī);second declension ,

Ancient GreekΚύπρος(Kpros,“Cyprus”)

curvus(femininecurva,neutercurvum); -i

fromLatincurvus(“bent, curved”), ultimately fromProto-Indo-European*(s)ker-(“to bend, curve, turn”)

cyclasf(genitivecyclatis);third declension ѫ

fromLatincirculus, diminutive ofcircus

cynismusmsg(genitivecynismī);second declension ,

FromAncient Greekκυνισμός(kunisms).

Cyclops, opis

(„“, :κύκλος– „“ όψ– „“)

́ (, .-.κύκλοςόψις)

FromAncient GreekΚύκλωψ(Kklōps,“one-eyed giant”), fromProto-Hellenic*kklōps, fromProto-Indo-European*pḱ-klōps(“cattle thief”).

deaf(genitivedeae);first declension(for the masculine form, seedeus) ѣ ѣ

i

FromOld Latindeiva, fromProto-Italic*deiwā.

FromProto-Italic*deiwā, fromProto-Indo-European*deyws.

decem(indeclinable) ѧ

FromProto-Italic*dekem, fromProto-Indo-European*dḱm̥. Cognates includeSanskritदश(daśa),Ancient Greekδέκα(dka),Old Englishtīen(Englishten).

decimus

decanus december decemiugis decemplex decemplicātus

decemvir decima decimō

Dēlosfsg(genitiveDēlī);second declension

FromAncient GreekΔῆλος(Dlos).

An island in theCyclades,Greece

Delphi

Borrowed fromAncient GreekΔελφοί(Delpho).

delphīnusm(genitivedelphīnī);second declension

FromAncient Greekδελφίν(delphn), a later form of the previousδελφίς(delphs,“a dolphin”), fromδελφύς(delphs,“womb”).

Deucaliōnm(genitiveDeucaliōnis);third declension ѣ

FromAncient GreekΔευκαλίων(Deukalōn).

Pyrrha i ѣi

FromAncient GreekΠύρρα(Prrha).

FromΠῠ́ρρος(Prrhos)+‎-ᾱ().

deusm(irregular,genitivedeī,femininedea);second declension i ѵ

divinus divina divinum

divinitus

dives divitis

divitiae divitarum

FromOld Latindeivos, fromProto-Italic*deiwos, fromProto-Indo-European*deyws. An o-stem derivative from*dyew-(“sky, heaven”),

Diana ѣ

Borrowed fromLate LatinDiāna, short form ofLatinDīāna, derived bysyncopefromOld LatinDīvāna, equivalent todīvus+‎-āna; roughly akin toProto-Italic*deiwā(“goddess”)+Proto-Indo-European*-nh₂. Originally an OldItalicdivinityoflightand themoon; later identified as theRomancounterpart toGreekgoddessArtemis. Cognate ofAttic GreekΔιώνη(Diṓnē), similarlysyncopatedfrom olderAncient GreekΔιϝωνη(Diwōnē), whence viaLatinDiōneis derivedEnglishDioneused in various ways across astronomy, chemistry, biology, and as a given name. From the same rootProto-Indo-European*dyh₃onh₂-also potentially cognate toEnglishJuneviaLatinJūnō.

Equivalent to the root ofdīvus(“god”)+‎-āna. The femininedīva(“goddess”)derived fromdeiva,

diēsmorf(genitivediēī);fifth declension

diurnus diurna diurnum

Back-formed from the accusativediem(at a time when the vowel was still long), fromProto-Italic*djēm, the accusative of*djous, fromProto-Indo-European*dyḗws(“heaven, sky”).[1]The original nominative survives as*diūs

Cognate withAncient GreekΖήν(Zḗn),Old Armenianտիւ(tiw,“daytime”),Old Irishda,Welshdydd,Polishdzień, but notEnglishday(q.v.) which is afalse cognate. The Italic stem was also the source ofIovis, the genitive ofIuppiterand was generally interchangeable with it in earlier times, still shown by the analogical formationDiēspiter.

do dedi datum dare

FromLatindare, present active infinitive of, fromProto-Italic*didō, fromProto-Indo-European*ddeh₃ti, from the root*deh₃-(“give”).

dōnō(present infinitivedōnāre,perfect activedōnāvī,supinedōnātum);first conjugation

dono donavi datum

Darius

Borrowed fromLatinDārīus, fromAncient GreekΔᾱρεῖος(Dāreos), fromOld PersianέΠμι΢ρ(d-a-r-y-u-š/dārayauš/), shortened form ofέΠμικ΢ρ(d-a-r-y-v-u-š/dārayava(h)uš/)

dōnumn(genitivedōnī);

dos dotis

doceō(present infinitivedocēre,perfect activedocuī,supinedoctum);second conjugation

fromProto-Hellenic*di-dəs-skō, Sanskritदिदेष्टि(dideṣṭi),दीक्षयति(dīkṣayati,“initiate, teach, prepare

doceo ui, ctum

doctor, oris

doctrina, ae

doctus ,a , um

FromProto-Italic*dokeō, causative ofProto-Indo-European*deḱ-(“to take”). Cognate withAncient Greekδοκέω(dokō,“I expect, suppose, seem”)andAncient Greekδέχομαι(dkhomai,“I accept, receive”). The sense "rehearse, present on stage" is asemantic loanfromAncient Greekδιδάσκω(didskō).

domus ,us

fromLatindomus.Doubletofdome.

ForProto-Italic*domos, fromProto-Indo-European*dṓm(“house, home”), from root*dem-(“to build”). Cognates includeAncient Greekδόμος(dmos),Albaniandhom(“a chamber, a room”),Avestanଛ଀ନ-‎(dam-)Sanskritदम(dma),Proto-Slavic*domand further toEnglishtimber. At least indirectly cognate toLatindominus.

dominus

domina

domicilium

domesticus

ducenti ,ae.a

duo duae duo

duodecim

ferō(present infinitiveferre,perfect activetulīortetulī,supinelātum);third conjugation,irregular

ѫ

ѣ

ѫ

The present stem is fromProto-Italic*ferō, fromProto-Indo-European*bʰreti(“to bear, carry”), from the root*bʰer-. Cognates includeSanskritभरति(bhrati),Persianبار‎(br),Old Armenianբերեմ(berem),Ancient Greekφέρω(phrō),Old Englishberan(Englishbear).

The perfect stem, originally oftollō, is fromProto-Italic*tetolai, fromProto-Indo-European*tetlh₂e(“to be holding up”), from the root*telh₂-. The stem oflātushas the same root, reduced fromProto-Italic*tlātos, fromProto-Indo-European*tl̥h₂ts. It is cognate withEnglishthole(“to endure”).

forno(accusative singularfornon,pluralfornoj,accusative pluralfornojn)

furnusm(genitivefurnī);second declension Bulgarian:(furna)

fortunaf(pluralfortune)

forsf(genitivefortis);third declension

FromProto-Italic*fortis, fromProto-Indo-European*bʰrtis(“the act of carrying”)(compareOld Irishbrith,GermanGeburt,Englishbear,burden,Russian(bremja,“burden”),(bratʹ,“to take”),Sanskritभृति(bhṛti,“carrying”)), derivative of*bʰer-, whence also Latinferō(“bring, carry”). For the semantic development, compareProto-Germanic*buriz(“favorable wind”), from the same root.

FromLatinfortūna, fromfōrs(“chance, luck”).

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Latin_nouns

Dictionnaire Latin Francais

https://www.grand-dictionnaire-latin.com/

Dizionario Latino Italiano

https://www.dizionario-latino.com/




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1. leonleonovpom2 - ,
01.06.2022 00:20
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2. panazea - , ,
01.06.2022 00:48
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